Monthly Archives: February 2016

Amazon.com: Deals: Toys & Games

Original article

Deals on Toys from Amazon.com

When birthdays, holidays, and other special occasions come up, it gets expensive to find the right toys for your little ones. We offer amazing deals on toys so shopping for gifts for yourself, your kids, or your nieces and nephews won’t drain your checking account.

We even offer great deals on top brands such as Melissa & Doug[1], Star Wars[2], LEGO[3], and more. Browse our collection of deals on Crayola[4] crafts; they make perfect gifts for boys, girls, or anyone with a creative spark. Our selection of great prices on toys from Mattel[5] includes dolls, action figures, toy cars, and much more. If you’re looking for playsets for younger children, we have a collection of toys from Fisher-Price[6] as well.

Anybody would be happy to receive one of our quality blasters[7]. We have Super Soakers for the summer, and blasters that shoot foam darts for playing indoors. Among our deals, we even have blasters shaped like bows and arrows when you or your kids want to feel like your favorite characters from The Hunger Games, Lord of The Rings, or Robin Hood.

Find great deals on our plush[8] and stuffed animals[9] in our Deals Store. From monkeys and lambs, to movie characters and Pokémon, you’ll find big bargains among our toys. Your next squishy, fuzzy, soft and floppy cuddle-mate could be hiding in our collection.

Save money by browsing our toy deals before paying big ticket prices. We even carry board games to play with the whole family, hobby items, wooden train tracks, and educational games to help your kids learn while they play. It’s already tough to shop for gifts; you shouldn’t have to worry about breaking the bank as well.

References

  1. ^ Melissa & Doug (www.amazon.com)
  2. ^ Star Wars (www.amazon.com)
  3. ^ LEGO (www.amazon.com)
  4. ^ Crayola (www.amazon.com)
  5. ^ Mattel (www.amazon.com)
  6. ^ Fisher-Price (www.amazon.com)
  7. ^ blasters (www.amazon.com)
  8. ^ plush (www.amazon.com)
  9. ^ stuffed animals (www.amazon.com)

Bing: toys shop (source)en

Best Toys of 2013: Find the Top Toys for Your Kids

Original article

Night lights fend of the darkness and the fear that comes with it. They’ve been helping children sleep since someone placed a candle next to their child trying to go to sleep in a creaky sod house on the homestead. Well, maybe not that scenario exactly, but the point is they have come in many [...]

Have a Cinderella fan on your hands? Or does your child just want a classy carriage to tote their dolls around in style? The Cinderella Pumpkin Carriage, complete with a noble white steed, may just be the thing you’re looking for. What Is It? The Cinderella Pumpkin Carriage is a plastic carriage that can ‘magically‘ [...]

Magnetic properties are fun and fascinating to people of all ages-even us adults-who tend to think we know too much to be amazed by everyday things. With the Magic Penny kit, you can build a plethora of different structures, and discover reactions that will delight and intrigue you and your family. There’s No Such Thing [...]

All of our toys and games are evolving right now. Classics from your childhood are getting blended with incredible technology to create something to satisfy kids in the here and now. Nothing is being spared-in fact it seems the more basic a toy was, the better it is to develop-especially in the case of Sphero. [...]

Drawing with magnets? It sounds strange, but it seems a lot of products coming out lately are bizarre or futuristic. With Magna Color, you can use little circular magnets to draw over a stencil, and with the addition of 3-D glasses, watch the design pop out. What Is It? The kit comes with a design [...]

Have you ever wanted to read someone’s mind? Or show the world how you’re feeling without having to announce it out loud? With Necomimi brainwave controlled cat ears, now you can. What Are They? These are a unique set of cat ears-they can pick up on your brainwaves and show certain emotions with their movements. [...]

Just as ‘Bop It’ came out with different, more challenging versions of the game when it became popular, so did Loopz. The original Loopz game was comprised of 4 simple U shapes. The light would flash, you would put your hand through that loop, and depending on your game you would move on. With Loopz [...]

I thrived on building little electronic things when I was younger-unfortunately; I often resorted to taking things apart like the remote, or the phone, because there wasn’t a huge range of toys that satisfied my building curiosity. Now, there’s an ever expanding amount of neat techy-electronic-engineering-building kits for kids to safely play around with and [...]

Bing: toys kids (source)en

Carnival Prizes, Kids Party Favors and Novelty Toys …

Original article

Welcome

SmallToys features inexpensive novelty toys used as carnival prizes and party favors for kids. In addition to carnival prizes, carnival supplies, and kids party favors you can shop more specific product categories like goodie bags, inflatable toys, light up novelties, glow in the dark novelties, temporary tattoos, patriotic novelties, student rewards, Christmas and Halloween novelties, and Santa Hats. Most of our simple toys sell for less than 50 cents. Kids from 5 years old to pre-teens love our novelty toys, prizes and party favors!

At SmallToys.com, we are experts at knowing all about novelty and inflatable toys. Our small toys can be easily used as prizes for kids at school, carnivals, doctors offices, dentist offices, and restaurants. They can be used to fill goody bags and as party favors for kids. Each small toy serves a purpose and nearly every purpose results in a smile.

Small toys can be used to decorate for parties and they can used when playing games. Some of our small toys can also be used in Halloween costumes and in dress-up play. All it takes is a little creativity to figure out how to use the plethora of small toys we have available online.

Our small toys from Novelty House make fantastic prizes at school or community carnivals. When you need to give a small and inexpensive gift, small toys are the perfect option. Instead of giving out candy, our small toys are fun Halloween treats. SmallToys.com is stocked with a variety of fun prices and filled with ideas for using them. Contact us if you have any questions.

Bing: toys kids (source)en

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Smart toys fail to protect kids – Shanghai Daily (subscription)

Original article

YOUR smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure — not perfect, maybe, but generally unlikely to be hacked or to store, say, your email where other people could read it.

The same can’t be said for any Internet-connected toys you may have purchased for your kids. Recently, discovered security flaws in a pair of such toys highlight just how badly the toy industry has neglected such problems, exposing kids to online threats.

While major crimes teeming from the hack of a connected toy haven’t yet surfaced, some experts argue that it’s only a matter of time.

Kids “aren’t expected to be Internet security experts and neither are their parents,” said Tod Beardsley, security research manager for Rapid7 Inc, the Boston-based cybersecurity firm that published the toy-security research on Tuesday.

Rapid7 researchers examined the Fisher Price Smart Toy, an interactive stuffed animal for children aged 3 to 8 that connects to the Internet via Wi-Fi. They also took a look at HereO, a GPS smartwatch that allows parents to track their child’s location.

In both cases, they found that the toys failed to safeguard children’s information such as their names and in the case of the watch, their location, storing it on remote servers in such a way that unauthorized people could access it by masquerading as legitimate users.

After researchers informed the manufacturers of the flaws, the companies quickly fixed the problems.

Mattel Inc, which owns the Fisher Price brand, released a statement recently emphasizing that it has no evidence that anyone actually stole any customer information because of the flaw. Eli Shemesh, chief technology officer for Cyprus-based HereO, released a statement saying that security remains paramount for his company, adding that the security flaw was fixed quickly and before the watches started shipping to customers.

Those security problems are far from unique, said Mark Stanislav, Rapid7’s manager of global services and the researcher who discovered the flaws. Reports of connected-toy vulnerabilities have been rife in recent months, a trend he expects to continue to worsen as more connected toys hit the market.

Toy makers need to be “building security in at the development phase,” Stanislav said in a statement.

Like many connected devices, the Fisher Price toy runs a version of Google’s Android operating system, the same software that powers many smartphones and tablets.

Beardsley, however, said toy makers don’t have the same commitment to security that a major tech company would have.

“I would be shocked if any Android-based toy didn’t have any problems,” he said.

Apple, whose iPhones and iPads are the biggest rivals to Android devices, doesn’t license its mobile software for use in toys.

Toy-related security problems began to grab headlines late last year, when kid’s tech maker VTech announced that one of its databases had been hacked, exposing the names, ages and genders of more than 6 million children who used the company’s toys.

As the number of connected toys continues to grow, so will the number of hackings, says Bridget Karlin, managing director of Intel Corp’s Internet of things group. Intel’s chips power a slew of connected devices, including a GPS smartwatch for kids, similar to the HereO, that’s set to go on sale later this year.

Karlin says that while the odds of any particular toy being hacked may be very low, most of the attacks are random. That means building in security from the ground up, starting at the silicon level.

In the case of the Fisher Price toy — which is sold as a stuffed bear, panda or monkey and retails for about US$ 100 — the researchers found that the toy’s software and applications weren’t appropriately verifying who was trying to access its information. That could theoretically expose a child’s name, birthday, spoken language and gender.

Of course, those tidbits of information aren’t necessarily secret. But hackers could theoretically amass enough of them to create a phishing scheme aimed at financial fraud or identity theft down the road.

In theory, the information could also be used to pull off the abduction of a child, though experts say the chance of that remains slim.

The same flaw also could allow an attacker to effectively take control of the device to do things such as change the account information, or monitor whether a child is playing with it or if an adult is using the related mobile app, the researchers said.

The HereO smartwatch is marketed as a safety device for children aged 3 to 12 and creates a social network restricted to invited family and friends.

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toys kids – Google News

Connected Toys Security

Kids’ connected toys might have security flaws – The Denver Post

Original article

Problems in two toys by Fisher Price, HereO could point to larger cybersecurity threat

The Smart Toy Bear, above, and the hereO GPS watches below. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same

The Smart Toy Bear, above, and the hereO GPS watches below. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same can’t be said for any Internet connected toys you may have purchased for your kids. (Studio OnE/hereO, Mattel via The Associated Press)

NEW YORK —

Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure — not perfect, maybe, but generally unlikely to be hacked or to store, say, your e-mail where other people could read it. The same can’t be said for any Internet-connected toys you might have purchased for your kids.

Recently discovered security flaws in a pair of such toys highlight just how badly the toy industry has neglected such problems, theoretically exposing kids to online threats.

While major crimes teeming from the hack of a connected toy haven’t yet surfaced, some experts argue that it’s only a matter of time.

This photo provided by Mattel shows the Smart Toy Bear. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same can

This photo provided by Mattel shows the Smart Toy Bear. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same can t be said for any Internet connected toys you may have purchased for your kids. (Mattel)

Kids “aren’t expected to be Internet security experts, and neither are their parents,” said Tod Beardsley, security research manager for Rapid7 Inc., the Boston-based cybersecurity firm that published the toy-security research last week.

Rapid7 researchers examined the Fisher Price Smart Toy, an interactive stuffed animal for children ages 3 to 8 that connects to the Internet via Wi-Fi.

They also took a look at hereO, a GPS smartwatch that allows parents to track their child’s location.

In both cases, they found that the toys failed to safeguard children’s information such as their names and — in the case of the watch — their location, storing it on remote servers in such a way that unauthorized people could access it by masquerading as legitimate users.


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After researchers informed the manufacturers of the flaws, the companies quickly fixed the problems.

Mattel Inc., which owns the Fisher Price brand, released a statement Monday emphasizing that it has no evidence that anyone stole any customer information because of the flaw.

Eli Shemesh, chief technology officer for Cyprus-based hereO, released a statement saying that security remains paramount for his company, adding that the security flaw was fixed quickly and before the watches started shipping to customers.

Those security problems are far from unique, said Mark Stanislav, Rapid7′s manager of global services and the researcher who discovered the flaws. Reports of connected-toy vulnerabilities have been rife in recent months, a trend he expects to worsen as more connected toys hit the market.

Toy makers need to be “building security in at the development phase,” Stanislav said.

Like many connected devices, the Fisher Price toy runs a version of Google’s Android operating system, the same software that powers many smartphones and tablets. Beardsley, however, said toy makers don’t have the same commitment to security that a major tech company would have.

“I would be shocked if any Android-based toy didn’t have any problems,” he said.

Apple, whose iPhones and iPads are the biggest rivals to Android devices, doesn’t license its mobile software for use in toys.

Toy-related security problems began to grab headlines late last year, when kids’ tech maker VTech announced that one of its databases had been hacked, exposing the names, ages and genders of more than 6 million children who used the company’s toys.

As the number of connected toys continues to grow, so will the number of hackings, said Bridget Karlin, managing director of Intel Corp.’s Internet of Things group.

Intel’s chips power a slew of connected devices, including a GPS smartwatch for kids, similar to the hereO, that’s set to go on sale this year.

Karlin said that although the odds of any particular toy being hacked might be very low, most of the attacks are random. That means building in security from the ground up, starting at the silicon level.

In the case of the Fisher Price toy — which is sold as a stuffed bear, panda or monkey and retails for about $ 100 — the researchers found that the toy’s software and applications weren’t appropriately verifying who was trying to access its information. That theoretically could expose a child’s name, birthday, spoken language and gender.

Those tidbits of information aren’t necessarily secret. But hackers theoretically could amass enough of them to create a phishing scheme aimed at financial fraud or identity theft down the road. In theory, the information also could be used to pull off the abduction of a child, although experts say the chance of that remains slim.

The hereO smartwatch is marketed as a safety device for children ages 3 to 12 and creates a kind of social network that’s restricted to invited family and friends.

The brightly colored watch has a cellular and GPS connection, allowing parents to monitor a child’s location through a mobile app. Features include messaging, location alerts and a panic button. The watch, which costs $ 179 in the U.S. plus a $ 4.95 per month monitoring fee, recently started shipping to customers around the world.

Rapid7 says its researchers found a way attackers could trick the watch into adding them onto a given family’s account. That would give them access to the entire family’s location history and profile details and even the ability to message parents or their kids.

toys kids – Google News

Connected Toys Security

Kids’ connected toys might have security flaws – The Denver Post

Original article

Problems in two toys by Fisher Price, HereO could point to larger cybersecurity threat

The Smart Toy Bear, above, and the hereO GPS watches below. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same

The Smart Toy Bear, above, and the hereO GPS watches below. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same can’t be said for any Internet connected toys you may have purchased for your kids. (Studio OnE/hereO, Mattel via The Associated Press)

NEW YORK —

Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure — not perfect, maybe, but generally unlikely to be hacked or to store, say, your e-mail where other people could read it. The same can’t be said for any Internet-connected toys you might have purchased for your kids.

Recently discovered security flaws in a pair of such toys highlight just how badly the toy industry has neglected such problems, theoretically exposing kids to online threats.

While major crimes teeming from the hack of a connected toy haven’t yet surfaced, some experts argue that it’s only a matter of time.

This photo provided by Mattel shows the Smart Toy Bear. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same can

This photo provided by Mattel shows the Smart Toy Bear. Your smartphone or tablet is most likely pretty secure, and unlikely to be hacked, but the same can t be said for any Internet connected toys you may have purchased for your kids. (Mattel)

Kids “aren’t expected to be Internet security experts, and neither are their parents,” said Tod Beardsley, security research manager for Rapid7 Inc., the Boston-based cybersecurity firm that published the toy-security research last week.

Rapid7 researchers examined the Fisher Price Smart Toy, an interactive stuffed animal for children ages 3 to 8 that connects to the Internet via Wi-Fi.

They also took a look at hereO, a GPS smartwatch that allows parents to track their child’s location.

In both cases, they found that the toys failed to safeguard children’s information such as their names and — in the case of the watch — their location, storing it on remote servers in such a way that unauthorized people could access it by masquerading as legitimate users.


Advertisement


After researchers informed the manufacturers of the flaws, the companies quickly fixed the problems.

Mattel Inc., which owns the Fisher Price brand, released a statement Monday emphasizing that it has no evidence that anyone stole any customer information because of the flaw.

Eli Shemesh, chief technology officer for Cyprus-based hereO, released a statement saying that security remains paramount for his company, adding that the security flaw was fixed quickly and before the watches started shipping to customers.

Those security problems are far from unique, said Mark Stanislav, Rapid7′s manager of global services and the researcher who discovered the flaws. Reports of connected-toy vulnerabilities have been rife in recent months, a trend he expects to worsen as more connected toys hit the market.

Toy makers need to be “building security in at the development phase,” Stanislav said.

Like many connected devices, the Fisher Price toy runs a version of Google’s Android operating system, the same software that powers many smartphones and tablets. Beardsley, however, said toy makers don’t have the same commitment to security that a major tech company would have.

“I would be shocked if any Android-based toy didn’t have any problems,” he said.

Apple, whose iPhones and iPads are the biggest rivals to Android devices, doesn’t license its mobile software for use in toys.

Toy-related security problems began to grab headlines late last year, when kids’ tech maker VTech announced that one of its databases had been hacked, exposing the names, ages and genders of more than 6 million children who used the company’s toys.

As the number of connected toys continues to grow, so will the number of hackings, said Bridget Karlin, managing director of Intel Corp.’s Internet of Things group.

Intel’s chips power a slew of connected devices, including a GPS smartwatch for kids, similar to the hereO, that’s set to go on sale this year.

Karlin said that although the odds of any particular toy being hacked might be very low, most of the attacks are random. That means building in security from the ground up, starting at the silicon level.

In the case of the Fisher Price toy — which is sold as a stuffed bear, panda or monkey and retails for about $ 100 — the researchers found that the toy’s software and applications weren’t appropriately verifying who was trying to access its information. That theoretically could expose a child’s name, birthday, spoken language and gender.

Those tidbits of information aren’t necessarily secret. But hackers theoretically could amass enough of them to create a phishing scheme aimed at financial fraud or identity theft down the road. In theory, the information also could be used to pull off the abduction of a child, although experts say the chance of that remains slim.

The hereO smartwatch is marketed as a safety device for children ages 3 to 12 and creates a kind of social network that’s restricted to invited family and friends.

The brightly colored watch has a cellular and GPS connection, allowing parents to monitor a child’s location through a mobile app. Features include messaging, location alerts and a panic button. The watch, which costs $ 179 in the U.S. plus a $ 4.95 per month monitoring fee, recently started shipping to customers around the world.

Rapid7 says its researchers found a way attackers could trick the watch into adding them onto a given family’s account. That would give them access to the entire family’s location history and profile details and even the ability to message parents or their kids.

toys kids – Google News

Something new to worry about: Security of your kids’ connected toys – San Jose Mercury News

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Something new to worry about: Security of your kids‘ connected toys
San Jose Mercury News
The same can’t be said for any Internet-connected toys you may have purchased for your kids. Recently discovered security flaws in a pair of such toys highlight just how badly the toy industry has neglected such problems, theoretically exposing kids to
Toys Patched Against Flaws That Put Children’s Data, Safety At RiskThreatpost
Smart Toys From Fisher-Price Discovered To Be Vulnerable To Hackers, Children’s Data Can Be StolenBizTek Mojo
New Security Flaws Discovered in IoT Smart Toys and Children GPS WatchesSoftpedia News

all 111 news articles »

toys kids – Google News

Lehi’s new Teton Toys store hoping to draw kids — young and old — from big box shops – Daily Herald

Original article

Wes Gardner, owner of Teton Toys in Lehi, credits his business success to Legos.

“I’m a Lego freak. I asked for Legos for every birthday and Christmas from when I was age 5 to 20,” he said. “If anyone got me anything else, I’d look at them like, ‘Why are you giving me this?’”

The confidence and competence he learned while throwing Legos out on the floor, building something that was just a concept or design in his head, is important to him. It’s also a type of play that can shape the dreamers of tomorrow.

“To create something in your own mind, and then build it in three dimensions, that is such a power. That is so cool,” Gardner said. “I built every shelf here, I had a vision for this store, because of Lego.”

The “here” Gardner is referring to is his new 6,300 square foot, natural light-infused Teton Toys[1] specialty store that sits at the border of American Fork and Lehi, just across State Street from Lowe’s. Of course, the store, which opened in November, features an impressive collection of Legos on this side of the Point of the Mountain. In fact, Teton Toys carries everything regular Lego Stores carry — except for special edition toys and the Pick-A-Brick option, two things possessively unique to Lego Stores.

But Legos are only the start. Teton Toys carries all the regular toy brands, like Mattel and Hasbro, but also the more unique brands, like Playmobil, Melissa & Doug, Groovy Girls and Brio. And if there’s a toy a customer wants but can’t find, Gardner’s team can hunt it down.

“My goal is, every time you turn a corner, something new is there, something that makes you say, ‘Wow, look at this,’” Gardner said. “My focus has been to match the store inventory as closely as possible with the interests of my customers. I take my cues from my shoppers when deciding what to order for the store.”

To that end, his store is not stocked and maintained like other department stores. He wants customers to feel like they are at home, just with a really big closet of toys. Wandering through the store is more an experience, a place to get lost in for a bit, to revisit old favorites and introduce them to a new generation of children. The 20-foot ceiling is painted to resemble a sky scene, and the pastel tones and hues on the walls suggest a relaxing atmosphere. In one corner of the store, Gardner set up a play area, so toddlers can come and play for free, and their parents can relax on the couches and catch a breather during errand-running.

Gardner sees stores like Target and Walmart as his chief competitors, and has set his prices accordingly. That said, he’s not as low as Walmart and can’t be. He may not be as low as what might be online, but he’s not much higher, he watches the toy market closely and he sets his prices accordingly.

“Every single one of the price tags is me making a conscious choice,” he said.

Customers don’t have to search the aisles for help either, as is often the case in department stores. His employees come to work excited to interact with kids, big and small, helping them find just the right doll, model, action figure, science kit, or dress-up outfit.

“I’m kinda a big kid myself, so I can relate to kids and their parents,” said Quinn Gardner, manager of Teton Toys. “Getting to interact with people is something I’m passionate about.”

Assistant manager Harley Marshall feels the same.

“I’m really interested in all toys, and I’m a people person, so I love being able to suggest toys. We have stuff Toys “R” Us doesn’t have. We have a lot more unique products,” Marshall said.

Gardner himself is no newbie to the toy scene either. At 37, he’s worked in retail for most of the past 20 years, and the Lehi store is actually the second under the Teton Toys brand. He started the first Teton Toys[2] store in 2010, in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. That store has become a destination point for world-traveling tourists, and a highly successful income source for him. So much so that when they heard he was going to take the risk to open a second store, friends in Wyoming thought he was crazy to give up the peace of the steady income and a smooth business situation.

“I don’t know what it is about me, but immediately, once I felt comfortable, it felt uncomfortable for me,” Gardner said.

So Gardner started looking for a second site to open another store.

“In Jackson, I heard thousands of times kids saying they saved their money because they knew they were coming there, and wishing they had a store in their hometown,” Gardner said.

So why Lehi, and why in a place with so much competition?

Gardner said he looked around at other states, at other locations, but they didn’t feel right.

“This is the best spot for in the country for me to open my second store. Northern Utah County is a mecca for families,” he said.

That said, it has not been an easy few months. If he had to do it again, he said he wouldn’t open in November but time his opening earlier in the shopping season. Interest in the Lehi store is still slowly growing, and he’s had to cut payroll, employees and other expenses. Without the success of the Jackson store, this one would have floundered already. But his expectations for the store are “phenomenally high,” because he believes there isn’t this unique type of specialty toy store in the county yet.

He even feels a bit like a pioneer, because he’s trying to bring back the specialty stores of another era.

“I’m trying to take advantage the whiplash against big box stores. But this is a lot of stress. Sometimes it feels like there’s a reason others aren’t doing this. But my goal is to continue this adventure, if I’m right,” he said.

For Gardner, his Legos of yesteryear challenged and stretched him, and owning a toy store is no different. He’s worked an exhausting amount of hours on the Lehi store, often going more than 36 hours without sleep. But it’s been worth it, and he hopes it will continue to be of worth to toy-lovers of Utah County.

“My growth as a person, as a business person has been phenomenal. I never in a million years thought I’d learn what I’ve learned in the last three months. I didn’t know what I didn’t know,” he said.

References

  1. ^ Teton Toys (www.facebook.com)
  2. ^ Teton Toys (teton-toys.com)

toys kids – Google News