Monthly Archives: June 2014

Toys 4 Smiles looking for kids for hardwood derby – KTNV

Original article

Las Vegas, NV (KTNV)Toys 4 Smiles[1] is hosting a hardwood derby at the Orleans from 8 a.m. to noon on June 28.  

It’s the first time they’ve done this event. They are making and numbering cars. They just need kids to come and race them.

Founder Rex Doty says, “We’re gonna invite 200 children to the Orleans hotel 8 to noon on the 28th of June and give them all the toys from Toys 4 Smiles and allow them to race and have some fun they may not be able to do ordinarily.”

Winners get prizes and every child gets to take home a toy.

If you run a summer camp for kids or want to take your kids, contact Toys 4 Smiles to reserve spots!

For more information, contact:

GARY GARBERG

702.205.9452

References

  1. ^ Toys 4 Smiles (toys4smileslasvegas.org)

toys kids – Google News

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Participate in Toys”R”Us Reusable Bag Promotion to help children during US … – Save the Children

Original article

Helping Kids be Kids

Participate in Toys”R”Us Reusable Bag Promotion to help children during U.S. emergencies.

“I don’t want to grow up…I’m a Toys“R”Us kid”. I clearly remember the Toys“R”Us jingle from when I was a child. Part of the reason the tune is so catchy is because it’s so true. Kids need time to just be kids; Time to savor and delight in the security of being cared for by grown-ups. Kids deserve to learn, have adventures, imagine other worlds, run around and play with toys. But, both Save the Children and Toys“R”Us realize how emergencies can abruptly steal a childhood.

Children are the most vulnerable in disasters. They aren’t just little adults; they have unique needs that make them susceptible to physical and emotional harm. In emergencies, children may witness devastating destruction; lose family members, homes and prized-possessions, and be unable to express the fear and anger that consumes their young minds. Kids may be separated from their family and not know how or when they will reunite with loved ones. The youngest children and those with special needs may be unable to get to safety or stay safe without specialized planning, equipment and supplies.

With an eye on these critical needs, Save the Children has responded to emergencies in the U.S. and around the world for nearly 100 years, providing for children and facilitating long-term community recovery. Since 2005, Toys“R”Us has been a critical partner in Save the Children’s emergency work, contributing more than $ 4 million to support emergency recovery in the U.S. and abroad, including Haiti, Japan and to help the littlest victims of Hurricane Sandy. It’s because of this generous support that millions of children received life-saving supplies and programs, providing kids with structure and support systems to cope with crisis.

While we cannot prevent disasters from occurring, we can prepare our families and communities before it’s too late. That’s why this year, Toys“R”Us and its support of Save the Children is going beyond emergency response and investing in our U.S. community preparedness initiative, Get Ready Get Safe[1]. To kick things off, the Toys“R”Us Children’s Fund donated $ 100,000 to Save the Children’s Domestic Emergency Fund.

You too can help strengthen disaster preparedness and relief programs right here in the U.S. by purchasing a reusable tote bag at your local Toys“R”Us store. One dollar from each purchase will go directly to Save the Children’s Domestic Emergency Fund. To learn more, please visit www.Toysrus.com/SavetheChildren[2].

Like the Toys“R”Us jingle states, kids don’t want to grow up – too fast. That’s why we must prepare our communities to protect children in emergencies; so that kids can be kids no matter what comes their way. Thanks for helping keep kids safe!

References

  1. ^ Get Ready Get Safe (www.savethechildren.org)
  2. ^ www.Toysrus.com/SavetheChildren (www.toysrus.com)

toys kids – Google News

PROP Shop needs summer toys, crafts – Chanhassen Villager

Original article

The PROP Shop family services room requests donations of outside summer toys and crafts for kids.

The PROP Shop is a nonprofit re-sale store, which sells new and gently used items to everyone in the community. It depends entirely on donations of furniture, clothing and housewares. The PROP Shop also offers a separate Family Service Center, which provides clothing, housewares and furniture to referred families and individuals in need in Chanhassen and Eden Prairie.

The PROP Shop is at 15195 Martin Drive in Eden Prairie. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday to Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Donations are accepted Tuesdays through Sundays during open hours.

For more information and a list of other needed items, visit www.propshopEP.org[1], email info@propshopEP.org[2] or call (952) 934-2323.

References

  1. ^ www.propshopEP.org (www.propshopEP.org)
  2. ^ info@propshopEP.org (www.chanvillager.com)

toys shop – Google News

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Toy shop Flying Penguin plays omni-channel game – BRW

Original article

Toy shop Flying Penguin plays omni-channel game

Flying Penguin’s Vicki Harding hopes to keep serving the Newtown community but also expand online. Photo: Nic Walker

When Vicki Harding opened the Flying Penguin toy store in the inner-Sydney suburb of Newtown nearly five years ago, she had a vision of owning a chain of stores.

But now Harding is shutting the bricks-and-mortar shop in favour of an alternative model that combines online sales, local markets and pop-up shops in the Christmas shopping season.

“What we want to be doing is go with what the customers want, so if the customers are not that interested in shopping through the year and we can’t pay rent, then it’s silly for us to be sitting there doing that when we can look at ways to activate the other spaces,” Harding says. “We can look at pop-ups, and we can look at the website, and social media and so on.”

The shop, on south King Street, started selling its stock – high-quality toys with an eco-friendly, educational bent – at a 30 per cent discount last week. Within weeks, Flying Penguin will shut its doors and immediately start selling at the local market at the corner of King Street and Australia Street on Saturdays.

Harding says the cost of the market stall is about 95 per cent lower than the rental bill, saving the business tens of thousands of dollars a year in rent. The current revenue of $ 280,000 a year is likely to be lower as a result of selling one day a week rather than six, but the profit margin will be higher.

Since the market stall is much smaller than the 80-square-metre shop, she plans to take a tablet to the markets to let customers order different products online, and offer free next-day delivery to the local area.

The biggest reason for shifting to a market stall nearby is to continue serving the local community. Flying Penguin is a much-loved brand on the Newtown high street, an area with a lot of young families. “It’s about making it as easy as possible for our customers to stay in touch with us and find us,” Harding says. “You have relationships with people when you’re there for [more than] four years.”

The toy business is highly seasonal, with 50 per cent of sales happening in the last 10 weeks of the year. Harding plans to open a pop-up shop in the Newtown area in November and December, and perhaps October.

She also sees huge potential in expanding Flying Penguin’s online business. “Online varies between 10 and 14 per cent of the business, it’s not enough to keep the family clothed and fed, but I’ve always seen the potential for that side of the business to grow, especially with some solid marketing,” Harding says. “I know there’s more we could be doing.”

Flying Penguin has 2614 Facebook fans and an email database of about 3000, as well as a presence on Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest. Harding says she posted about the sale on Facebook and the next day was extremely busy, then she emailed the database and the following day was busier still. She plans to devote more effort to social media marketing once she is no longer sitting in the shop all day.

Longer term she is keen to upgrade warehousing and online marketing. including search engine optimisation. In the short-term she will move to a storage facility and she already has arrangements with some suppliers to drop-ship.Flying Penguin is 100 per cent owned by Harding and her family.

toys shop – Google News

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These Photos of Children Around the World With Their Toys Prove That Kids Just … – RYOT

Original article

Photographer and journalist, Gabriele Galimberti spent over a year photographing children from over 50 countries with their “most prized possessions: their toys.”

In explaining his concept, the brilliant artist stated: “From Texas to India, Malawi to China, Iceland to Fiji, I recorded the spontaneous and natural joy that unites kids despite their diverse backgrounds.”

Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 12.38.40 PMBububu, Zanzibar Town, Tanzania: “Arafa and Aisha are twins. They sleep in the same bed, they have the same clothes, they go to school together and they share the same toys. They live in a house with two rooms. Both of those rooms are bedrooms. The kitchen and restroom are outside. The big photo on the wall above the closet is a portrait of the formal president of Zanzibar.” Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 1.11.37 PMMchinji, Malawi: “In the small hut where Chiwa lives with her mother, father and sister, they don’t have electricity or running water. Chiwa used to help her mother to carry water at home from the river. In the village there are other 50 children (more or less) and they always play all together outside. Chiwa has just three toys that some volunteers from an NGO gave to her when she was born. Her favourite is the dinosaur because she says that he can protect her from the dangerous animals.” Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 12.58.05 PMKalulushi, Zambia: “Maudy was born in a hut in a small village close to Kalulushi, in Zambia. She grew up playing on the street together with all the other children of the village. There is just a simple school there, children are together in the same class from 3 to 10 years old. In the village there are not shops, restaurants, hotels and just few children are lucky to have some toys. Maudy and her friends found a box full of sunglasses on the street some weeks ago and from that moment those sun glasses are their favourite toys.” Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 12.58.33 PMEl Nido, Philippines: “Allenah Lajallab, who is 4 years old, was born and raised in El Nido, a small town north of Palawan in the Philippines. In El Nido there weren’t hospitals and she was born at home. She has a lot of peluches and her favourite is the orange one because she loves the colour. The one that she doesn’t like at all is the white one because it gets dirty too easily.” Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 12.58.51 PMBangkok, Thailand: “Watcharapon loves motorbikes! His father has a scooter and every morning puts his helmet before to leave the house, then he goes out, on the street in front of the house where he keeps his scooter and he goes to work. Watcharapon loves to imitate him and puts the helmet at home, then he plays with his little motorbikes.” Ubud, Gianyar 80571, Indonesia: "Puput was born at home, in Bali, four years ago. She has never met her father because he died when her mother was five months pregnant. Her mother works as a cook in a little street restaurant just 200 meters from the her house. Puput doesn’t have many toys. She loves balls and she has only ever played with them. She uses the plastic ones like bowling pins, place them on the ground in a triangle and then with the rubber ball hits them."Ubud, Gianyar 80571, Indonesia: “Puput was born at home, in Bali, four years ago. She has never met her father because he died when her mother was five months pregnant. Her mother works as a cook in a little street restaurant just 200 meters from the her house. Puput doesn’t have many toys. She loves balls and she has only ever played with them. She uses the plastic ones like bowling pins, place them on the ground in a triangle and then with the rubber ball hits them.” Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 1.06.36 PMAmerican Fork, UT, USA: “Virginia was born in Salt Lake City, but she has past her first five years of life in American Fork, a little town 50km south of the capital. She is from a mormon family. She love to play baseball together with her little brother. He launches the ball and she hits it… it never happens the opposite! In the garden her family keep some animals, like goats and chickens. She has a favourite goat and she always wants to play with her.” Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 1.00.57 PMKiev, Kyiv city, Ukraine: “Pavel doesn’t have doubts, he wants to be a police man. He loves guns and he plays with them all the time. His younger brother is always under Pavel’s arrest! Pavel handcuffs him, questions him, and accuses him of stealing cars. He lets his brother be the police man just sometimes, but just to be his fellow when other friends come to their home and obviously his friends immediately become the “bad people” to arrest!” Screen Shot 2014-06-09 at 1.01.37 PMSão Paulo, Brazil: “Gabriele is the second of two brothers. He lives with his parents, his brother and his grandmother in a small house in a poor neighborhood of São Paulo. Almost all of the toys that he has are animal palouches wearing Nestlè T-shirts. They are all gifts that his mother gets collecting points from milk and yogurt made by Nestlè.”

How precious are these smiling children?

Galimberti concludes, “At their age, they are pretty all much the same. They just want to play.”

Toy Stories remind us that as humans, we are all connected, and much more similar than we are led to believe. We occupy the same planet. We all laugh, we all worry, and we all love.

And there is no difference too grand to stop us from connecting as human beings.

You can see Galimberti’s entire innovative series by purchasing his book, Toy Stories: Photos of Children From Around the World and Their Favorite Things[1]

Tagged:

Children Featured News Good human rights innocence toys[2][3][4][5][6][7]

References

  1. ^ Toy Stories: Photos of Children From Around the World and Their Favorite Things (www.amazon.com)
  2. ^ Children (www.ryot.org)
  3. ^ Featured News (www.ryot.org)
  4. ^ Good (www.ryot.org)
  5. ^ human rights (www.ryot.org)
  6. ^ innocence (www.ryot.org)
  7. ^ toys (www.ryot.org)

toys kids – Google News

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Sex toys may be illegal in many African states but social taboos are fading – The Guardian

Original article

Sex toys. Asking about them in polite society usually causes raised eyebrows and mumbles about inappropriateness, but you don’t need to be a private detective to discover that they’re bought, sold and used anywhere you care to look in Africa.

The sale of sex toys is illegal in many countries, although some governments rely on social shame – which is fading fast – as a means of regulation. Nonetheless, even where selling them remains illegal, sex toys still manage to creep across the border.

What seems to be happening is that governments are anti-sex toys but the people aren’t. The internet has made it easier for anyone who wants an erotic helper to bypass the law, but it’s importers who shoulder the risks since they’re the ones likely to have their goods seized at customs. This probably accounts for the relatively high prices of sex toys in many countries.

Countries such as Zimbabwe and Mauritius have actively said no to bedroom trinkets but there are websites that offer tips on how to sneak your sex toys on holiday.
[1]

Here’s how the sex toy situation differs from country to country:

South Africa: a thriving industry

You might be surprised to learn that it’s only in the last decade that it stopped being illegal to manufacture or sell sex toys in South Africa. We have the apartheid government to thank for the Immorality Amendment Act of 1969[2], which prohibits the sale of any item “intended to be used to perform an unnatural sexual act” – an amendment apparently intended to prevent the use of dildos by lesbians. It’s gratifying to be able to report that South Africa now has one of the most liberal constitutional and legal frameworks in the world on matters sexual.

What that means is that in South Africa today you cannot throw a stone without hitting an Adult World, although some of its branches so dark and seedy you worry you’ll catch an STD just walking in.
[3]

The chain, which has 60 stores nationwide, is currently embroiled in a tiff with the ANC[4] for opening a store opposite Parliament in Cape Town.

Adult World’s selection of products ranges from videos for all tastes (BDSM[5], lesbian porn, women in cheerleader outfits) all the way to 10-inch long replicas of male genitalia.

There are more tasteful shops around, such as the Whet Sensuality Emporium in Cape Town. It’s women and couples oriented – they even manufacture their own lubricant and the owner gives advice to couples in her consultation room.
[6][7]

Then there’s the annual SEXPO[8], showcasing the best of the best in terms of sex toys, costumes and general erotica. Not to mention the hundreds of online stores such as HoneyHoney[9] and FemmeSensuelle[10].

Ronnies sex shopRonnie’s Sex Shop in South Africa Photograph: Steve Cornish/flickr[11]

Kenya: the taboo is fading

Taboo surrounding sex toys in Kenya has pretty much faded, especially in Nairobi where more and more sex shops are opening. One example is River Road[12] – although be warned it’s also where to go for anything from AK 47s to fake death certificates or Harvard Masters certificates, printed while you wait. There’re also online sites such as Bored of Men[13].

Kenyan law prohibits the sale of pornography and “obscene materials”, but according to Nairobi lawyer Humprey Manyange there is no law in Kenya that prohibits the sale, distribution or circulation of sex toys. He added that “there should be caution on the mode of display and selling to avoid the disturbance of public peace and breach of public morality.”

Kenyans are spoilt for choice online with stores such as Doctor Crocodildo[14]; Pazuri Place[15] (who claim to have delivered over 1,300 packages since 2009); RahaToys[16] (“If you are in Nairobi, we send the delivery guy to bring the item to you”); The Secret Kenya[17] and kenyasecrets.com[18] (“the finest and biggest collection of sex toys in Kenya), offering same-day deliveries.

This more relaxed attitude means Kenyans no longer need to have their sex toys mailed in discreet unmarked packages. Women are now spending up to 10,000ksh ($ 112) on vibrating bullets, but you also have shops like the aforementioned RahaToys where you can get a super stretchy gel erection ring for the low, low price of 420 Ksh ($ 4) or a Fetish Fantasy Series Door Swing for 5,590 Ksh.

Zimbabwe: confusion over the rules

In Zimbabwe the daughter of a well known businessman (who also happens to be a former ZANU-PF[19] MP as well as a cousin of Robert Mugabe) caused tongues to wag when she held sex toy auctions in Harare[20] and organised peep shows whilst selling a selection of lingerie – all of which was labelled “immoral” by government officials.

Vannessa Chiyangwa’s case revealed a contradiction in the government’s official position on sex toys. According to Zimbabwe Revenue Authority’s director of legal and corporate services, Florence Jambwa, the importation of the toys into the country is prohibited under the Customs and Excise Act. However, Censorship Board secretary Isaac Chiranganyika said whoever intended to import or trade in sex toys had to seek permission from the board.

“Anyone who wants to do that business should first bring them [the toys] to our offices for approval,” he added.

Perhaps the board’s staff members want test drive the products, for quality control? Joking aside, the rules are confusing. It’s illegal to import sex toys but you must have your sex toys approved by the censorship board before you’re allowed to sell the illegal imports? Perhaps the government is trying to encourage local sex-toy manufacturing.

People have been caught smuggling sex toys into Zimbabwe, with some of the main culprits being foreigners attending the Harare International Festival of The Arts. Apparently officials confiscated the highest number of sex toys during the festival. Arty folk, eh! But more seriously, this is probably an attempt to crackdown on lefty festival with it’s “foreign” connections.
[21]

The Board say they’ve kept all the vibrators and dildos impounded over the past two years (most of the sex toys are for use by women, but there are some “female organs” among the contraband). But this claim was contradicted by Florence Jambwa, who says they destroy all the sex toys they confiscate. Sounds like the Censorship Board members are having a whale of a time at home. And seeing as the festival was only a few weeks ago, they must have all new stock.

Nigeria: contraband but rampant

If you read the article This is Africa posted recently about Nigerians and their sex toys[22], you probably assumed sex toys were legal in Nigeria. Not so. They are contraband, according to government officials.

Nigerians might come over all abashed when you raise the topic in public, but sex toys are starting to become more popular, even in the northern states that abide by Sharia law. Perhaps government officials have enough wahala on their hands to add chasing after sex toy importers to the list, or maybe they know they’ll be onto a losing battle if they do.

Sex toys know no age, social class or marital status barriers in Nigeria. In Lagos, one newspaper journalist found more than 20 shops selling sex toys (mostly small stalls). One trader, who preferred to remain anonymous, said most of his customers were couples, with the male partners saying they preferred to have a toy as a “competitor” rather than another man. Another trader said she had to take her business online because people who had the “balls” to enter her shop just browsed a lot without buying much. Her sales went up by 120% with the move.

On the upscale end of the market, there was an influx of Swedish-made sex dolls[23] into the country a few years ago. According to the product specs, the dolls’ skin was “99.8% human texture”– as it should be with a price tag of $ 6,000. Clearly imported for the rich, these super dolls. The dolls last two years, are completely adjustable to any position, have 100 sensors all over the body (including 30 in/on the private parts) and get “wet” and moan when penetrated, apparently. “Best money you will ever spend,” said one man who is either the sole importer or a very, very happy customer.

For those not wishing to break the bank, there’s Intimate Pleasures[24], Nigeria’s first online sex shop catering specifically to women. The owner, feminist writer and human rights activist Iheoma Obibi, also holds wellness classes and intimacy afternoon sessions.

There are shops selling sex toys in Ghana, offline (in Accra some street hawkers even sell them) and online Area 51[25], GH erotic[26] (where you can WhatsApp your order). Though, again, the Ghanaian government considers sex toys “obscene” and has been known to close down sex shops;. In Swaziland, women have been known to throw “product parties” and there have been calls for the government to legalise the sale of sex toys. Supporters say there’s no valid reason why women should be deprived of their inviolable right to choose how they pleasure themselves.

This appears to be a case of governments failing to move with the times, and to comprehend the reasonable desires of their citizens. Governments, we want our sex toys, and we will get them any way we can, whether you like it or not!

A longer version of this article originally appeared on This is Africa[27]

References

  1. ^ sneak your sex toys on holiday (www.femalefirst.co.uk)
  2. ^ Immorality Amendment Act of 1969 (www.nelsonmandela.org)
  3. ^ Adult World (www.adultworld.co.za)
  4. ^ currently embroiled in a tiff with the ANC (mg.co.za)
  5. ^ BDSM (www.google.co.uk)
  6. ^ Whet Sensuality Emporium (www.facebook.com)
  7. ^ their own lubricant (www.whet.co.za)
  8. ^ EXPO (www.sexpo.co.za)
  9. ^ HoneyHoney (honeyhoney.co.za)
  10. ^ FemmeSensuelle (www.femmesensuelle.co.za)
  11. ^ Photograph: Steve Cornish/flickr (www.flickr.com)
  12. ^ River Road (nairobinews.nation.co.ke)
  13. ^ Bored of Men (www.boredofmen.com)
  14. ^ Doctor Crocodildo (doctorcrocodildo.com)
  15. ^ Pazuri Place (www.pazuriplace.com)
  16. ^ RahaToys (rahatoys.com)
  17. ^ The Secret Kenya (secretkenya.kbo.co.ke)
  18. ^ kenyasecrets.com (www.kenyasecrets.com)
  19. ^ ZANU-PF (www.theguardian.com)
  20. ^ sex toy auctions in Harare (www.thestandard.co.zw)
  21. ^ Harare International Festival of The Arts (www.hifa.co.zw)
  22. ^ Nigerians and their sex toys (thisisafrica.me)
  23. ^ influx of Swedish-made sex dolls (dailypost.ng)
  24. ^ Intimate Pleasures (www.myintimatepleasureshop.com)
  25. ^ Area 51 (mycatalogueshop.net)
  26. ^ GH erotic (www.gherotic.com)
  27. ^ This is Africa (thisisafrica.me)

toys shop – Google News

PROP Shop needs summer toys, crafts – Chanhassen Villager

Original article

The PROP Shop family services room requests donations of outside summer toys and crafts for kids.

The PROP Shop is a nonprofit re-sale store, which sells new and gently used items to everyone in the community. It depends entirely on donations of furniture, clothing and housewares. The PROP Shop also offers a separate Family Service Center, which provides clothing, housewares and furniture to referred families and individuals in need in Chanhassen and Eden Prairie.

The PROP Shop is at 15195 Martin Drive in Eden Prairie. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday to Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Donations are accepted Tuesdays through Sundays during open hours.

For more information and a list of other needed items, visit www.propshopEP.org[1], email info@propshopEP.org[2] or call (952) 934-2323.

References

  1. ^ www.propshopEP.org (www.propshopEP.org)
  2. ^ info@propshopEP.org (www.chanvillager.com)

toys shop – Google News

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Kids’ original sketches become cherished plush toys – Today.com

Original article

inspirational[1]

June 5, 2014 at 1:43 PM ET

Pink Octopus, drawn by Taylor Podraza, who was killed in a car crash in 2010. It was given to her best friend Maddie Vosik as a gift and way to remember her.

Budsies

Pink Octopus, drawn by Taylor Podraza, who was killed in a car crash in 2010. It was given to her best friend Maddie Vosik as a gift and way to remember her.

This past winter, Christine Vosik of Omaha, Nebraska, surprised her 14-year-old daughter, Maddie, with a special stuffed toy — a cheery pink octopus with orange splotches and curly tentacles. 

The toy was based on a picture drawn by the girl who Maddie did everything with, Taylor Podraza, who signed it and wrote: “Dedicated to my best friend Maddie Vosik.” Seven months after sketching the octopus, Taylor was killed in a car crash in December, 2010, but Maddie had never seen the picture until it was found in October and given to her.

Maddie’s beloved octopus is part of a line of one-of-a-kind creations by Budsies, a company that makes handmade stuffed toys and animals based on a child’s own drawing.

“I feel better because it’s something cuddly that reminds me of her, so it’s hugging a piece of her,” Maddie said. “It was made for me, so it’s really special to me.”

The Super Micah, drawn by Michale DeLong for her brother Micah

Budsies

The Super Micah, drawn by Michale DeLong for her brother Micah

In Munster, Indiana, Michale DeLong, 15, drew a picture of her brother, Micah, as “Super Micah,” a grinning superhero with an “M” on his chest. Micah has cerebral palsy, and cannot speak or stand, yet has surpassed his life expectancy and smiles when he’s happy.

15 year old Michael DeLong designed a Budsie for her brother Micah, who has cerebral palsey.

DeLong family

15 year old Michale DeLong designed a Budsie for her brother Micah, who has cerebral palsey.

The siblings’ grandmother, Mary Miller, had a Budsie made of “Super Micah,” and Michale gave it to her brother for his 10th birthday in March, a tender moment for the family.

“He’ll look over at it and he’ll smile,” Miller said, adding that it “personifies what the family feels.”

“He’s taught the whole family that with love and with patience you can always exceed expectations,” said Miller, 60, of Sarasota, Florida. The Budsie will be an enduring symbol of Micah, and will accompany him to the hospital for a risky spinal operation later this month, Miller said.

Budsies founder Alex Furmansky said the company’s vision is to let children be the designers of their toys. “You’re taking their imagination and bringing it to life in something huggable,” he said. While they play a special role in the healing of some families’ heartaches, Budsies were inspired by a practical problem familiar to every parent.

Furmansky, 29, saw the art made by his sister, Michelle, 13, go from the refrigerator and kitchen walls into storage bins in the basement. While art may be put away and forgotten, he knew kids love stuffed animals.

“It’s their imagination and it’s being lost in some basement or garage or attic,” he said. “The idea came about, how can I bring together this beautiful imagination that this child creates with the longevity and the devotion and love that they give to these stuffed toys?”

After the first two Budsies[2] were made for Michelle, her friends wanted them as well. The company, which was started in Lake Worth, Florida, last September, has since turned out about 1,300 Budsies.

“I thought it’d be a fun, cool thing for kids to immortalize their creativity and it’s turned into something so much more important to so many families,” Furmansky said.

Those families inspired Furmansky to donate Budsies, which cost $ 69, to children in need[3]. In April, nine children were treated to Budsies through the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Eastern Pennsylvania and Easter Seals in Indiana.

“You have these kids going through tough times and they could use a buddy with them to keep them company and give them strength,” Furmansky said.

Lisa A. Flam is a news and lifestyles reporter in New York. Follow her on Twitter[4].

References

  1. ^ inspirational (www.today.com)
  2. ^ first two Budsies (www.budsies.com)
  3. ^ children in need (www.budsies.com)
  4. ^ Twitter (twitter.com)

toys kids – Google News

1C5160781-lisaflam.blocks_desktop_avatar

Kids’ original sketches become cherished plush toys – Today.com

Original article

inspirational[1]

June 5, 2014 at 1:43 PM ET

Pink Octopus, drawn by Taylor Podraza, who was killed in a car crash in 2010. It was given to her best friend Maddie Vosik as a gift and way to remember her.

Budsies

Pink Octopus, drawn by Taylor Podraza, who was killed in a car crash in 2010. It was given to her best friend Maddie Vosik as a gift and way to remember her.

This past winter, Christine Vosik of Omaha, Nebraska, surprised her 14-year-old daughter, Maddie, with a special stuffed toy — a cheery pink octopus with orange splotches and curly tentacles. 

The toy was based on a picture drawn by the girl who Maddie did everything with, Taylor Podraza, who signed it and wrote: “Dedicated to my best friend Maddie Vosik.” Seven months after sketching the octopus, Taylor was killed in a car crash in December, 2010, but Maddie had never seen the picture until it was found in October and given to her.

Maddie’s beloved octopus is part of a line of one-of-a-kind creations by Budsies, a company that makes handmade stuffed toys and animals based on a child’s own drawing.

“I feel better because it’s something cuddly that reminds me of her, so it’s hugging a piece of her,” Maddie said. “It was made for me, so it’s really special to me.”

The Super Micah, drawn by Michale DeLong for her brother Micah

Budsies

The Super Micah, drawn by Michale DeLong for her brother Micah

In Munster, Indiana, Michale DeLong, 15, drew a picture of her brother, Micah, as “Super Micah,” a grinning superhero with an “M” on his chest. Micah has cerebral palsy, and cannot speak or stand, yet has surpassed his life expectancy and smiles when he’s happy.

15 year old Michael DeLong designed a Budsie for her brother Micah, who has cerebral palsey.

DeLong family

15 year old Michale DeLong designed a Budsie for her brother Micah, who has cerebral palsey.

The siblings’ grandmother, Mary Miller, had a Budsie made of “Super Micah,” and Michale gave it to her brother for his 10th birthday in March, a tender moment for the family.

“He’ll look over at it and he’ll smile,” Miller said, adding that it “personifies what the family feels.”

“He’s taught the whole family that with love and with patience you can always exceed expectations,” said Miller, 60, of Sarasota, Florida. The Budsie will be an enduring symbol of Micah, and will accompany him to the hospital for a risky spinal operation later this month, Miller said.

Budsies founder Alex Furmansky said the company’s vision is to let children be the designers of their toys. “You’re taking their imagination and bringing it to life in something huggable,” he said. While they play a special role in the healing of some families’ heartaches, Budsies were inspired by a practical problem familiar to every parent.

Furmansky, 29, saw the art made by his sister, Michelle, 13, go from the refrigerator and kitchen walls into storage bins in the basement. While art may be put away and forgotten, he knew kids love stuffed animals.

“It’s their imagination and it’s being lost in some basement or garage or attic,” he said. “The idea came about, how can I bring together this beautiful imagination that this child creates with the longevity and the devotion and love that they give to these stuffed toys?”

After the first two Budsies[2] were made for Michelle, her friends wanted them as well. The company, which was started in Lake Worth, Florida, last September, has since turned out about 1,300 Budsies.

“I thought it’d be a fun, cool thing for kids to immortalize their creativity and it’s turned into something so much more important to so many families,” Furmansky said.

Those families inspired Furmansky to donate Budsies, which cost $ 69, to children in need[3]. In April, nine children were treated to Budsies through the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Eastern Pennsylvania and Easter Seals in Indiana.

“You have these kids going through tough times and they could use a buddy with them to keep them company and give them strength,” Furmansky said.

Lisa A. Flam is a news and lifestyles reporter in New York. Follow her on Twitter[4].

References

  1. ^ inspirational (www.today.com)
  2. ^ first two Budsies (www.budsies.com)
  3. ^ children in need (www.budsies.com)
  4. ^ Twitter (twitter.com)

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