Monthly Archives: May 2014

9/11 memorial shop merchandise

Are the 9/11 museum’s commemorative toys and hoodies a step too far? – The Guardian

Original article

9/11 memorial shop merchandise

9/11 Memorial Museum merchandise.

There is a gift shop at the 9/11 Memorial Museum[1], which opens this week in New York[2]. Should that be surprising? It is a museum, after all, a place that will no doubt be visited by many tourists who will want to take home souvenirs. The exhibition also needs their money, on top of what it receives in donations and admission fees, in order to meet the $ 63m annual cost of staying open. Even on a project of such sensitivity, this must have seemed like common sense at the planning stage.

Some of the early visitors, however, who come from among those with a personal connection to 9/11, do not see it that way. “I think it’s a money-making venture to support inflated salaries,” Diane Horning told the New York Post[3], “and they’re willing to do it over my son’s dead body.” In this case, those words are almost literally true. The museum is built underground beside a “remains repository” containing roughly 8,000 unidentified body parts, quite possibly including Horning’s son Matthew, whose remains were never found.

What’s actually on sale in the gift shop is another tricky matter. In places, it seems to turn remembering 9/11 into something like a fashion statement. There is the black twin towers hoodie[4] emblazoned with the words, “In darkness we shine brightest” ($ 39). There is the silk scarf printed with a full-colour twin towers design[5] ($ 95). There is even the Search & Rescue Dog cuddly toy[6] ($ 19.95). Whether anybody buys these items, we will have to wait and see. In the meantime, and in the new museum’s defence, it is worth noting that this is far from the first commemorative gift shop in the world.

Here are four more museums[7] with a sensitive line in souvenirs:

Auschwitz-Birkenau

At the scene of perhaps the greatest atrocity in living memory, and indeed online at the official Auschwitz website[8], you can buy memorial CDs and DVDs, postcards, books and posters. This strikes some people as odd, but it is done quite solemnly, and the items are solely educational. There is certainly nothing you can wear.

Imperial War Museum

Marmite tin Get the ‘wartime expereince’ at the Imperial War Museum.

Besides keeping lots of old tanks and guns, at least part of the IWMs’ remit is to document the “wartime experience”, including life on the home front. As a result, in the gift shop you can spend £10 on a “vintage Marmite cake tin”[9] or even a “retro alarm clock”, in a choice of red or green.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

Along with a peace park and some truly horrifying exhibits, there is a gift shop on the site of the nuclear explosion that killed more than 100,000 people in 1945. There are books, of course, but there are also peace-themed souvenirs and T-shirts[10].

The Museum of the Great War

Books about the first world war are the main theme in Péronne in northern France, near the site of the Battle of the Somme. There are also posters and DVDs[11], however, and even model aircraft and toy soldiers.

References

  1. ^ a gift shop at the 9/11 Memorial Museum (www.911memorial.org)
  2. ^ More from the Guardian on New York (www.theguardian.com)
  3. ^ told the New York Post (nypost.com)
  4. ^ black twin towers hoodie (www.911memorial.org)
  5. ^ the silk scarf printed with a full-colour twin towers design (www.911memorial.org)
  6. ^ the Search & Rescue Dog cuddly toy (www.911memorial.org)
  7. ^ More from the Guardian on Museums (www.theguardian.com)
  8. ^ the official Auschwitz website (en.auschwitz.org)
  9. ^ spend £10 on a “vintage Marmite cake tin” (www.iwmshop.org.uk)
  10. ^ peace-themed souvenirs and T-shirts (www.atomicbombcinema.com)
  11. ^ posters and DVDs (en.historial.org)

toys shop – Google News

pegperego_battery

Kids Wheels Ride on Toys

Original article

Peg Perego 12 Volt Battery Model: IAKB0501[1]

Peg Perego 12 Volt Battery Model: IAKB0501[2]

pegperego battery

12 Volt High Capacity Rechargable battery

12 Volt sealed, maintenance free High Capacity Battery

Internal short circuit protection

Preselected for safety and efficiency with Peg perego vehicles

Made in China

Warranty: 6 months

Description: Peg Perego Rechargeable Battery Model Number IAKB0501 UPC # 0 16337 12130 1
Carton Dimensions: H; 6.25” W; 7.25” D; 6.5” Weight; 10.5 lbs (shipping weight) Cube; .17”

 

Peg Perego Battery Chargers[3]
Shop with Kids Wheels for Peg Perego battery chargers. We stock most Peg Perego battery chargers and batteries for your Peg Perego Kids Ride on Toys. Most batteries and Peg Perego battery chargers are shipped the same day.  Be sure to properly install your Peg Perego battery and use your Peg Perego battery chargers according to directions or damage may result to the battery charger or battery. Peg Perego battery chargers are designed specificly for Peg Perego toys and chargers other than Peg Perego battery chargers should not be used. All Peg Perego 6 volt battery and batteries come fully charged and ready to use.

Shop for Peg Perego Battery Chargers

 

Peg Perego 6 Volt Battery[4]

Shop with Kids Wheels for Peg Perego 6 volt battery. We stock most Peg Perego 6 volt battery and batteries for your Peg Perego Kids Ride on Toys. Most batteries and Peg Perego 6 volt batteries are shipped the same day. Be sure to properly install your Peg Perego 6 volt battery before use or damage to the Peg Perego 6 volt battery or unit may result. Peg perego 6 volt battery are designed specificly for Peg Perego toys and batteries other than Peg Perego 6 volt battery should not be used. All Peg Perego 6 volt battery and batteries come fully charged and ready to use.

Shop for Peg Perego 6 Volt Batteries and 6 Volt Toy Battery

 

Pedal Cars Pedal Trucks and Pedal Planes[5]

Pedal CarsKids wheels is an authorized reseller of kids pedal cars. A pedal car is a great gift for your children for Christmas or birthdays. Kids wheels also offers parts for pedal cars. Antique pedal cars and ride on pedal cars, reproduction pedal cars, authentic pedal cars.  Get your children a gift they will always remember, pedal cars are fun and safe if properly used. Please follow the directions provided by the pedal car manufacturer for pedal car safety.  We have pedal cars from Winther, pedal cars from John Deere, Ford reproduction model T pedal cars, firetruck pedal cars and many more models of pedal cars.

Read more… [Pedal Cars Pedal Trucks and Pedal Planes][6]

 

Bing: toys kids (source)en

9/11 memorial shop merchandise

Are the 9/11 museum’s commemorative toys and hoodies a step too far? – The Guardian

Original article

9/11 memorial shop merchandise

9/11 Memorial Museum merchandise.

There is a gift shop at the 9/11 Memorial Museum[1], which opens this week in New York[2]. Should that be surprising? It is a museum, after all, a place that will no doubt be visited by many tourists who will want to take home souvenirs. The exhibition also needs their money, on top of what it receives in donations and admission fees, in order to meet the $ 63m annual cost of staying open. Even on a project of such sensitivity, this must have seemed like common sense at the planning stage.

Some of the early visitors, however, who come from among those with a personal connection to 9/11, do not see it that way. “I think it’s a money-making venture to support inflated salaries,” Diane Horning told the New York Post[3], “and they’re willing to do it over my son’s dead body.” In this case, those words are almost literally true. The museum is built underground beside a “remains repository” containing roughly 8,000 unidentified body parts, quite possibly including Horning’s son Matthew, whose remains were never found.

What’s actually on sale in the gift shop is another tricky matter. In places, it seems to turn remembering 9/11 into something like a fashion statement. There is the black twin towers hoodie[4] emblazoned with the words, “In darkness we shine brightest” ($ 39). There is the silk scarf printed with a full-colour twin towers design[5] ($ 95). There is even the Search & Rescue Dog cuddly toy[6] ($ 19.95). Whether anybody buys these items, we will have to wait and see. In the meantime, and in the new museum’s defence, it is worth noting that this is far from the first commemorative gift shop in the world.

Here are four more museums[7] with a sensitive line in souvenirs:

Auschwitz-Birkenau

At the scene of perhaps the greatest atrocity in living memory, and indeed online at the official Auschwitz website[8], you can buy memorial CDs and DVDs, postcards, books and posters. This strikes some people as odd, but it is done quite solemnly, and the items are solely educational. There is certainly nothing you can wear.

Imperial War Museum

Marmite tin Get the ‘wartime expereince’ at the Imperial War Museum.

Besides keeping lots of old tanks and guns, at least part of the IWMs’ remit is to document the “wartime experience”, including life on the home front. As a result, in the gift shop you can spend £10 on a “vintage Marmite cake tin”[9] or even a “retro alarm clock”, in a choice of red or green.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

Along with a peace park and some truly horrifying exhibits, there is a gift shop on the site of the nuclear explosion that killed more than 100,000 people in 1945. There are books, of course, but there are also peace-themed souvenirs and T-shirts[10].

The Museum of the Great War

Books about the first world war are the main theme in Péronne in northern France, near the site of the Battle of the Somme. There are also posters and DVDs[11], however, and even model aircraft and toy soldiers.

References

  1. ^ a gift shop at the 9/11 Memorial Museum (www.911memorial.org)
  2. ^ More from the Guardian on New York (www.theguardian.com)
  3. ^ told the New York Post (nypost.com)
  4. ^ black twin towers hoodie (www.911memorial.org)
  5. ^ the silk scarf printed with a full-colour twin towers design (www.911memorial.org)
  6. ^ the Search & Rescue Dog cuddly toy (www.911memorial.org)
  7. ^ More from the Guardian on Museums (www.theguardian.com)
  8. ^ the official Auschwitz website (en.auschwitz.org)
  9. ^ spend £10 on a “vintage Marmite cake tin” (www.iwmshop.org.uk)
  10. ^ peace-themed souvenirs and T-shirts (www.atomicbombcinema.com)
  11. ^ posters and DVDs (en.historial.org)

toys shop – Google News

Kids Toys Online – Play.com (UK) – Free Delivery

Original article

With over 30 years of experience, there’s not much The Entertainer doesn’t know about toys. In fact, they’re the biggest independent toy retailer in the UK with 89 busy stores across the UK. The Entertainer also has a huge online selection. So whether it’s the hottest new product or a well-loved classic, they’ve got something for everyone.

Visit The Entertainer[1]

References

  1. ^ Visit The Entertainer (www.play.com)

Bing: toys kids (source)en

Kids bored? Borrow toys from the Berea Library: Community Voices – Sun News

Original article

BEREA, Ohio — With more than 700 toys in stock, the Cuyahoga County Library System can keep children of all ages happy and engaged.

There are toys for infants and toddlers, preschoolers, and older children who like to play board games or work on science and math projects. There are blocks, puzzles, toy trucks, puppets, Legos, games to help with numbers and the alphabet. There are family games, such as Sorry.

“Once families discover the Toy Lending Library, they are hooked,” said Marlene Rodgers, children’s librarian at the Berea Branch. “It’s a way of switching out toys, so kids don’t get bored.”

You can borrow toys like you borrow books, said Pam DeFino, Berea Branch manager. The toy collection is stored at the Library System’s administrative offices in Parma with a smaller collection at the Brooklyn Branch. Patrons can access the toy catalog online at www.cuyahogalibrary.org[1] or peruse a hard copy in the children’s section of the Berea Library. The catalog contains a picture of each toy and a description. Once a toy is requested, it is usually delivered within two to three days, DeFino said.

“It’s delivered in a box. You pick it up as you would a book,” she said. Loans are for three weeks and are renewable. Late fees on returns are 10 cents per day.

Rodgers said toys are sometimes borrowed for special occasions. “We had a pastor borrow several for a church carnival,” she said. Grandparents faced with a visit from out-of-town grandchildren often reserve age-appropriate toys, too.

“The toys are fun and educational. This program has become really popular,” DeFino said.

Once toys are returned, they are sanitized before they are loaned again, DeFino noted.

For more on the Toy Lending Library, call (216) 749-9525, visit www.cuyahogalibrary.org or call the Berea Branch at 440-234-5475.[2]

References

  1. ^ www.cuyahogalibrary.org (www.cuyahogalibrary.org)
  2. ^ www.cuyahogalibrary.org (www.cuyahogalibrary.org)

toys kids – Google News

Little Tiger Toys in downtown Bellingham will close for good later this month. – The Bellingham Business Journal (blog)

Original article

Little Tiger Toys closing shop in downtown Bellingham[1]

by
Filed on 14. May, 2014 in News[2][3]

Little Tiger Toys in downtown Bellingham will close for good later this month. Store manager Selah Tay-Song announced the decision in an email to customers on May 14. Little Tiger Toys has begun a liquidation sale of its merchandise; the store carries toys and games for customers of all ages. The store’s final day will be Monday, May 26, Tay-Song said. Until then, Little Tiger Toys will keep its regular daily hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and might stay open later in the evening on a few of its remaining days, she added. “We deeply appreciate all of the community relationships and support,” Tay-Song said. “We have a lot of customers who care about what we do, but not enough customers to carry us in this space.” Tay-Song said Little Tiger Toys struggled to make a profit each year since moving to its current location at 112 Grand Ave.[4], in May 2012. The store opened in 2008 at 1417 Railroad Ave., next to Casa Que Pasa.

Calling 2014 a “make it or break it” year, Tay-Song said the goal was to grow Little Tiger Toys’ annual profit by 1-5 percent by the end of the year. But that goal now appears unattainable.

She declined to say how much money Little Tiger Toys made in 2013. But she did say the store was profitable prior to its move to Grand Avenue.

Tay-Song said Little Tiger Toys faced significant competition from online retailers. She said her staff would regularly overhear customers discussing how they had previously seen or purchased in-store merchandise through Amazon or other Web-based merchants.

Along with additional competition from other local toy stores, Tay-Song said the business faced several other challenges, including a drop in foot traffic and available parking after the store moved locations downtown.

In the end, business expenses simply overran sales, she said.

Tay-Song said she and her staff have greatly appreciated all of the support customers gave the store. She noted how customers pulled through to help Little Tiger Toys weather a loss of sales from a temporary store closure last December[5] after a burst pipe caused significant water damage.

“People came out in a such a big way,” she said.

Evan Marczynski, associate editor of The Bellingham Business Journal, can be reached at 360-647-8805, Ext. 5052, or evan@bbjtoday.com[6]

Read more about: , , [8][9][10]

COMMENTING RULES: We encourage an open exchange of ideas in the BBJ Today community, but we ask you to follow our guidelines[11] for respecting community standards. In a nutshell, don’t say anything you wouldn’t want your mother to read.

So keep your comments:
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We ask that all participants own their words by logging in with their Facebook account. It’s a simple process that will take seconds and helps keep our comments free of trolls, cranks, and “drive-by” commenters. We reserve the right to remove comments from anyone using screen names, pseudonyms or false identities. Please see our FAQ[12] if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

toys shop – Google News

trans_1x1

Kids Toys, Wood Toys, Children’s Furniture | FREE SHIPPING

Original article

Simply Kids Toys offers high quality kids furniture[1] and wooden toys[2] for children with a lowest price guarantee and Free Shipping. We are a kids toys store with long lasting and safe bicycles, tricycles[3], slides and swing sets, puzzles, train sets, and more. Our durable kids toys are built with lead-free, non-toxic paints to meet the highest safety standards. Simply Kids Toys also has the best kids furniture, including toddler beds, chair and table sets[4], toy boxes[5] and other toy storage solutions. And just like our childrens toys, our childrens furniture[6] has the best prices and widest selection. If you’re looking for high quality classic wooden toys and board games or well-built kids furniture at the lowest price guaranteed, Simply Kids Toys makes it easy. Toys and furniture for kids that are safe and built to last, with low prices, free shipping, and satisfaction guaranteed: that’s Simply Kids Toys.

image

References

  1. ^ kids furniture (www.simplykidstoys.com)
  2. ^ wooden toys (www.simplykidstoys.com)
  3. ^ tricycles (www.simplykidstoys.com)
  4. ^ chair and table sets (www.simplykidstoys.com)
  5. ^ toy boxes (www.simplykidstoys.com)
  6. ^ childrens furniture (www.simplykidstoys.com)

Bing: toys kids (source)en

53724e2ee27ae.preview-300

Top 10 toys 80s kids survived – Daily Herald

Original article

Michele's Top Ten

I’m very surprised I survived the 80s. My mom had six kids and taught piano lessons in the home, which meant my siblings and I spent quite a bit of time playing outside without adult supervision, left to our wild imaginations. Here are the top ten toys that should have killed me but luckily just created the need for stitches, Neosporin and bandages. Let me know if I forgot your favorite classic “deadly” toy. 

10. Metal Playground Equipment

Back in the old days, all of the parts of your basic swingset — the slides, swing bottoms, monkey bars, etc. —  were made of metal. This seems like an excellently sturdy idea until the first really hot day of summer when you race to be the first one down the long slide and your short shorts expose maximum skin to the blazing hot metal. So much pain.

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It’s slogan, “The ball that takes you higher and higher,” is especially accurate for those of us that tried to combine this already dangerous toy with mini-trampolines (a popular activity in my youth). 

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These seem innocent enough —  cute little images that you make and bake in the oven as decorations. However, if you cooked them too long or wrong in any way, a hazardous smoke filled the whole house. Let’s just say my sisters and I were not that good at following directions.

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Sure, these are innocent — if you have excellent fine motor skills. I didn’t. Neither do these kids. 

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Regular roller skates can be dangerous, but Rollerblades are far worse. Many of us, after watching some cool daredevil down the street, thought it would be easy enough to ride down hand rails and landed right on our helmetless heads.

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The commercials made it look so sweet and innocent; baking little cakes with friends. In real life, however, many fingers, hands and even legs were burned with this hot little hazard.

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Poking your eye out was just one of many painful injuries caused by this “harmless” alternative to a real weapon. It wasn’t just human injuries either. Many a squirrel and bird can attest to that.

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For those kids growing up in hot summers with no pool, this was a great second-best. The problem was that you glided right off onto sharp objects, rocks and cement porches. Ouch! 

2. Trampolines

These bouncy death traps were all the rage in the early 80s, but they came without padding or safety nets. It’s amazing just how many body parts can be damaged when you land on them after gaining momentum from an incredibly high bounce.

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Who would have thought that large pointy metal darts being thrown by children would be dangerous? Not toy makers in the 80s!

toys kids – Google News

can-muti-1-hi-res11

The Top 10 Toys That Kindle Kids’ Creativity – Forbes

Original article

Can you teach kids to be innovative? You can certainly try, but you won’t get very far if you don’t foster creativity first.

Believe me, with all the open-ended creative toys in our house, you’d think an afternoon with my kids would look like a day of blocks, marbles and paintbrushes, but I still have my share of “Mom, iPad code please.”  Even though I bring my kids some of the world’s best toys and games, I will be the first to admit that sometimes encouraging creativity in children is really hard work.  You really have to walk the walk, and that means getting down on the floor and actually playing with them. Many of us don’t feel we have enough time for that, but I truly believe it is worth the investment.

Another thing worth our investment is the kind of toys we buy.  It’s not easy to spot a gem that fits your family.  If you are in need of ideas, here’s a list of top 10 favorite toys that honor the creative process, categorized into four helpful hints that boost learning through play:

Hint 1: Creativity Starts at Home

Creativity doesn’t have to look like it was plucked from the sky.  Rather, it is in our everyday comforts of home where we are most inspired to create. Think of how many of the world’s most innovative companies were started in garages.

1. Roominate Deluxe[1]-  ($ 39.99) Roominate makes building, lighting, and mechanizing things so easy that a child’s mind can experiment with her structure with much more fluidity.  The toy’s design naturally invites other materials giving Roominate even more play value.  Don’t be surprised if you see her adding in things from her toybox instead her wanting you to buy more sets to keep the play going. That is a sure sign that the creative process is at full speed. Moreover, while this toy was especially created to encourage girls to explore STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) subjects, Roominate easily crosses over into boys’ play as my son realized that designing homes can be rigorously challenging. Just ask Vanilla Ice[2].

2. Young Architect[3] – ($ 79.95) There are some children who are such perfectionists that they do not want to create anything at all.  In the workplace- perfectionists can either be viewed as “detail-oriented” and “diligent” but they may also be seen as someone who never takes risks.  We don’t ever want that but how do we get these kids to think outside the box?  I have just the thing! Chances are that even the most critical hairsplitters will have a great time playing with Young Architects. Everything is made of precut blocks and stencils that can be mixed and matched easily, so there is less worry about precision and structural integrity. This is the kind of scaffolding that young inventors need sometimes to let their imaginations soar.

Hint 2: There Are No Wrong Answers 

Developmental psychologist Dr. Jennie Ito of The Play Kitchen[4], thinks toys that inspire creativity are definitely worth the investment.  “They’re teaching children to be creative thinkers, to be flexible thinkers and to be problem-solvers because there isn’t one right answer.” Ito says such toys lets them feel emotionally secure to explore.  “It doesn’t always have to work out and that’s okay,” Ito says. Kids can fear failure just as much as adults can.

3. Zometool Creator 1[5] – ($ 65) If the Goddess of Math had to choose one toy to be her representative, there is no question that Zometool would be plucked for the job.  It’s like a calculator.  You just can’t go wrong.  Once you start putting things together and making connections you will come to know the law of Zometool:  if it works, it works perfectly.  If it doesn’t, then you’ll just know.  Play can be delightfully intuitive this way. Creative thinking can be too. You want your own child to be familiar with the movements of his own compass.  The best toys do that – naturally.

4. Disruptus[6]- ($ 24.99) I just had to include this game in this list of toys because Disruptus is no ordinary game.  It is sure to blow you away whether you are at a company retreat or a family vacation. Disruptus is an innovative-thinking exercise practiced by firing off ideas based on images of objects and a directive determined by the roll of the die .  My son’s favorite play is when the die lands on “Create 2″ in which he must doodle or talk about creating something using objects he finds on two cards drawn from the deck.  Once after rolling “Create 2,” with just an image of multiple balconies and a slanted dumpster lid, he came up with a idea of a rainwater collection system.  That was an unforgettable moment for both of us.

Hint 3: Befriend Technology

Do you ever fear that kids will get too used to everything being delivered with minimal effort or thought because of technology? I used to be this way. After a lot of parental soul-searching (and tech toy testing), I’ve decided that to raise innovative thinkers, I must become one myself.  Thus, this year, I bought my first soldering iron and tried my best to embrace toys that simplified technology but still challenged kids.  It’s not that easy to find but these three are winners.

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5. MaKey MaKey[7] – ($ 49.95) This unusual kit has a very constructivist approach to learning which is what makes it so fun.  The kids set the level of difficulty each time they play. Basically you plug it in and it allows you to make anything that can conduct electricity become a key on your keyboard – even a banana.  Kids can use the MaKey Makey to make almost anything they want including using paint[8] to compose music and even creating their own games.  We managed to make our own version of the game Operation by just using some LEGO bricks, some playdough, and our computer.  The result was not only fun, it left a whopping supply of self-confidence.

6. Sphero[9] – ($ 129.99) What could be more fun than a ball? How about a robotic one? Veteran toy industry expert Richard Gottlieb[10] had lots to say about technology and play, pointing to how kids’ tablets came out just two years after the iPad was introduced to the world. Gottlieb called Sphero an excellent use of technology and said, “It’s taking one of the oldest play platforms we have, which is a ball and uses technology to expand the ball experience.” Sphero continues to expand children’s worlds by introducing educational lessons that include mathematics and programming via their newly launched education initiative: SPRK (Schools -Parents -Robots -Kids)[11].

7. Thames & Kosmos Remote Control Machines[12] – ($ 84.95) One of the reasons why kids lose interest in their remote control toys is because there is a lack of what they can actually control.  This unique set allows you to control up to three motors that do what your child chooses to but all with just one controller.  Of course, the tricky but fun part is your child will have to build this contraption herself. The good news is that the set comes with excellent visual instructions in which techniques can be learned just by making model after model (crane, robotic arm, folding car).  Their very sturdy parts provide children with the most fluid experience building and creating their own robotic anythings.

Hint 4: It’s Okay to Talk About It!

Do we really ever talk about creativity aside from acknowledging that it’s good? Sometimes I feel awkward talking about it as if I have no right to judge what is or isn’t creative.  However, the reality is that everyone values creativity therefore it is judged in one way or another.  If that is the case, we should talk about how important it is to us and how much of our kids’ creativity and flexible thinking skills are being challenged at home and at school.

Last year, Creativity for Kids launched a "Creativity Comeback" and gave away over 50,000 free creativity cans to kids at neighborhood toy stores. They will continue to distribute them this year. Schools and other non-profits can also apply to receive free cans. Check www.creativitycan.com for more details.

Last year, Creativity for Kids launched a “Creativity Comeback” and gave away over 50,000 free creativity cans to kids at neighborhood toy stores. They will continue to distribute them this year. Schools and other non-profits can also apply to receive free cans. Check www.creativitycan.com for more details.

8. The Big Creativity Can[13] – ($ 19.99) The magic comes not from the contents of the can, although they are delightful. Instead, the incentive to create comes from the actual can itself.  The very presence of the can in your home says that you value creativity. What your child does with the can is up to her. To add to the challenge (and hopefully the fun), you can open the can as a family and make things together. Collaboration and cooperation won’t be optional. Don’t be surprised if you see unusual acts kindness and courtesy taking place.  Moreover, you can give yourself a present by getting a new can every few months and allowing your child to show you just how much she’s grown since you last opened a can.  Last year my child made a cute monster pet and a home for it. This year he blew me away after he opened a fresh can to make a foam sculpture that he balanced using a single metal bell.

9. LEGO Mixels[14] ($ 4.99 each) Do not be surprised if you see families waiting outside the LEGO store around the middle of this month.  That is when the 2nd series of LEGO Mixels will be available for sale (at LEGO stores first, June 1 for all other stores).  Mixels are so incredibly interesting.  Unlike many LEGO sets, these LEGO products were made to be mixed. One of my testers said of her two sons (ages 4 and 8), “They build according to the directions but as soon as they are done they like to modify and make it ‘better.’” Her children also love the Mixel terminology where some odd mixing can make a MURP – “a weird mixed-up Mixel with a totally unique personality that cannot be controlled.” To me, MURPs humorously demonstrate that creativity is something to be respected. It’s not just random mixing. You still have to make sense especially to the most hard-to-please customers: children.

Kaleidograph comes in several styels, Color (Crystal and Flora) or Black and White pictured (Contrast and OpArt)

Kaleidograph comes in several styles, Color (Crystal and Flora) or Black and White pictured (Contrast and OpArt)

10. Kaleidograph[15] – ($ 14.99) What do you do with restless kindergarteners on a school bus?  I speak the truth when I tell you that Kaleidograph made that day unbelievably joyful. These simple die-cut cards of different colors and shapes make kids go crazy trying to show their creations. I just sat there laughing as children practically fell over each other attempting to get my attention. It almost felt like I was holding a bouquet of chuckling flowers. Thus it is no wonder that Kaleidograph is said to be created in the tradition of the “Gifts” of Friedrich Froebel[16], the founder of the original Kindergarten (translated in German: garden of children). You can try it online[17] first but be warned, you might end up staying up all night seeking that perfect combination.

Note: Every product has been personally tested by Toys Are Tools’ kid testers. Products were submitted to facilitate a review. Reviews are never promised.

More best toy tips from Jenn at Toys Are Tools[18].

References

  1. ^ Roominate Deluxe (poof-slinky.com)
  2. ^ Vanilla Ice (www.diynetwork.com)
  3. ^ Young Architect (poof-slinky.com)
  4. ^ The Play Kitchen (theplaykitchen.strikingly.com)
  5. ^ Zometool Creator 1 (www.zometool.com)
  6. ^ Disruptus (funnybonetoys.com)
  7. ^ MaKey MaKey (makeymakey.com)
  8. ^ paint (www.youtube.com)
  9. ^ Sphero (www.gosphero.com)
  10. ^ Richard Gottlieb (www.forbes.com)
  11. ^ education initiative: SPRK (Schools -Parents -Robots -Kids) (http)
  12. ^ Thames & Kosmos Remote Control Machines (www.thameskosmos.com)
  13. ^ The Big Creativity Can (creativitycan.com)
  14. ^ LEGO Mixels (www.lego.com)
  15. ^ Kaleidograph (kaleidographtoy.com)
  16. ^ “Gifts” of Friedrich Froebel (www.froebelgifts.com)
  17. ^ try it online (kaleidographtoy.com)
  18. ^ Toys Are Tools (www.toysaretools.com)

toys kids – Google News

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The Top 10 Toys That Kindle Creativity – Forbes

Original article

Can you teach kids to be innovative? You can certainly try, but you won’t get very far if you don’t foster creativity first.

Believe me, with all the open-ended creative toys in our house, you’d think an afternoon with my kids would look like a day of blocks, marbles and paintbrushes, but I still have my share of “Mom, iPad code please.”  Even though I bring my kids some of the world’s best toys and games, I will be the first to admit that sometimes encouraging creativity in children is really hard work.  You really have to walk the walk, and that means getting down on the floor and actually playing with them. Many of us don’t feel we have enough time for that, but I truly believe it is worth the investment.

Another thing worth our investment is the kind of toys we buy.  It’s not easy to spot a gem that fits your family.  If you are in need of ideas, here’s a list of top 10 favorite toys that honor the creative process, categorized into four helpful hints that boost learning through play:

Hint 1: Creativity Starts at Home

Creativity doesn’t have to look like it was plucked from the sky.  Rather, it is in our everyday comforts of home where we are most inspired to create. Think of how many of the world’s most innovative companies were started in garages.

1. Roominate Deluxe[1]-  ($ 39.99) Roominate makes building, lighting, and mechanizing things so easy that a child’s mind can experiment with her structure with much more fluidity.  The toy’s design naturally invites other materials giving Roominate even more play value.  Don’t be surprised if you see her adding in things from her toybox instead her wanting you to buy more sets to keep the play going. That is a sure sign that the creative process is at full speed. Moreover, while this toy was especially created to encourage girls to explore STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) subjects, Roominate easily crosses over into boys’ play as my son realized that designing homes can be rigorously challenging. Just ask Vanilla Ice[2].

2. Young Architect[3] – ($ 79.95) There are some children who are such perfectionists that they do not want to create anything at all.  In the workplace- perfectionists can either be viewed as “detail-oriented” and “diligent” but they may also be seen as someone who never takes risks.  We don’t ever want that but how do we get these kids to think outside the box?  I have just the thing! Chances are that even the most critical hairsplitters will have a great time playing with Young Architects. Everything is made of precut blocks and stencils that can be mixed and matched easily, so there is less worry about precision and structural integrity. This is the kind of scaffolding that young inventors need sometimes let their imaginations soar.

Hint 2: There Are No Wrong Answers 

Developmental psychologist Dr. Jennie Ito of The Play Kitchen[4], thinks toys that inspire creativity are definitely worth the investment.  “They’re teaching children to be creative thinkers, to be flexible thinkers and to be problem-solvers because there isn’t one right answer.” Ito says such toys lets them feel emotionally secure to explore.  “It doesn’t always have to work out and that’s okay,” Ito says. Kids can fear failure just as much as adults can.

3. Zometool Creator 1[5] – ($ 65) If the Goddess of Math had to choose one toy to be her representative, there is no question that Zometool would be plucked for the job.  It’s like a calculator.  You just can’t go wrong.  Once you start putting things together and making connections you will come to know the law of Zometool:  if it works, it works perfectly.  If it doesn’t, then you’ll just know.  Play can be delightfully intuitive this way. Creative thinking can be too. You want your own child to be familiar with the movements of his own compass.  The best toys do that – naturally.

4. Disruptus[6]- ($ 24.99) I just had to include this game in this list of toys because Disruptus is no ordinary game.  It is sure to blow you away whether you are at a company retreat or a family vacation. Disruptus is an innovative-thinking exercise practiced by firing off ideas based on images of objects and a directive determined by the roll of the die .  My son’s favorite play is when the die lands on “Create 2″ in which he must doodle or talk about creating something using objects he finds on two cards drawn from the deck.  Once after rolling “Create 2,” with just an image of multiple balconies and a slanted dumpster lid, he came up with a idea of a rainwater collection system.  That was an unforgettable moment for both of us.

Hint 3: Befriend Technology

Do you ever fear that kids will get too used to everything being delivered with minimal effort or thought because of technology? I used to be this way. After a lot of parental soul-searching (and tech toy testing), I’ve decided that to raise innovative thinkers, I must become one myself.  Thus, this year, I bought my first soldering iron and tried my best to embrace toys that simplified technology but still challenged kids.  It’s not that easy to find but these three are winners.

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5. MaKey MaKey[7] – ($ 49.95) This unusual kit has a very constructivist approach to learning which is what makes it so fun.  The kids set the level of difficulty each time they play. Basically you plug it in and it allows you to make anything that can conduct electricity become a key on your keyboard – even a banana.  Kids can use the MaKey Makey to make almost anything they want including using paint[8] to compose music and even creating their own games.  We managed to make our own version of the game Operation by just using some LEGO bricks, some playdough, and our computer.  The result was not only fun, it left a whopping supply of self-confidence.

6. Sphero[9] – ($ 129.99) What could be more fun than a ball? How about a robotic one? Veteran toy industry expert Richard Gottlieb[10] had lots to say about technology and play, pointing to how kids’ tablets came out just two years after the iPad was introduced to the world. Gottlieb called Sphero an excellent use of technology and said, “It’s taking one of the oldest play platforms we have, which is a ball and uses technology to expand the ball experience.” Sphero continues to expand children’s worlds by introducing educational lessons that include mathematics and programming via their newly launched education initiative: SPRK (Schools -Parents -Robots -Kids)[11].

7. Thames & Kosmos Remote Control Machines[12] – ($ 84.95) One of the reasons why kids lose interest in their remote control toys is because there is a lack of what they can actually control.  This unique set allows you to control up to three motors that do what your child chooses to but all with just one controller.  Of course, the tricky but fun part is your child will have to build this contraption herself. The good news is that the set comes with excellent visual instructions in which techniques can be learned just by making model after model (crane, robotic arm, folding car).  Their very sturdy parts provide children with the most fluid experience building and creating their own robotic anythings.

Hint 4: It’s Okay to Talk About It!

Do we really ever talk about creativity aside from acknowledging that it’s good? Sometimes I feel awkward talking about it as if I have no right to judge what is or isn’t creative.  However, the reality is that everyone values creativity therefore it is judged in one way or another.  If that is the case, we should talk about how important it is to us and how much of our kids’ creativity and flexible thinking skills are being challenged at home and at school.

Last year, Creativity for Kids launched a "Creativity Comeback" and gave away over 50,000 free creativity cans to kids at neighborhood toy stores. They will continue to distribute them this year. Schools and other non-profits can also apply to receive free cans. Check www.creativitycan.com for more details.

Last year, Creativity for Kids launched a “Creativity Comeback” and gave away over 50,000 free creativity cans to kids at neighborhood toy stores. They will continue to distribute them this year. Schools and other non-profits can also apply to receive free cans. Check www.creativitycan.com for more details.

8. The Big Creativity Can[13] – ($ 19.99) The magic comes not from the contents of the can, although they are delightful. Instead, the incentive to create comes from the actual can itself.  The very presence of the can in your home says that you value creativity. What your child does with the can is up to her. To add to the challenge (and hopefully the fun), you can open the can as a family and make things together. Collaboration and cooperation won’t be optional. Don’t be surprised if you see unusual acts kindness and courtesy taking place.  Moreover, you can give yourself a present by getting a new can every few months and allowing your child to show you just how much she’s grown since you last opened a can.  Last year my child made a cute monster pet and a home for it. This year he blew me away after he opened a fresh can to make a foam sculpture that he balanced using a single metal bell.

9. LEGO Mixels[14] ($ 4.99 each) Do not be surprised if you see families waiting outside the LEGO store around the middle of this month.  That is when the 2nd series of LEGO Mixels will be available for sale (at LEGO stores first, June 1 for all other stores).  Mixels are so incredibly interesting.  Unlike many LEGO sets, these LEGO products were made to be mixed. One of my testers said of her two sons (ages 4 and 8), “They build according to the directions but as soon as they are done they like to modify and make it ‘better.’” Her children also love the Mixel terminology where some odd mixing can make a MURP – “a weird mixed-up Mixel with a totally unique personality that cannot be controlled.” To me, MURPs humorously demonstrate that creativity is something to be respected. It’s not just random mixing. You still have to make sense especially to the most hard-to-please customers: children.

Kaleidograph comes in several styels, Color (Crystal and Flora) or Black and White pictured (Contrast and OpArt)

Kaleidograph comes in several styles, Color (Crystal and Flora) or Black and White pictured (Contrast and OpArt)

10. Kaleidograph[15] – ($ 14.99) What do you do with restless kindergarteners on a school bus?  I speak the truth when I tell you that Kaleidograph made that day unbelievably joyful. These simple die-cut cards of different colors and shapes make kids go crazy trying to show their creations. I just sat there laughing as children practically fell over each other attempting to get my attention. It almost felt like I was holding a bouquet of chuckling flowers. Thus it is no wonder that Kaleidograph is said to be created in the tradition of the “Gifts” of Friedrich Froebel[16], the founder of the original Kindergarten (translated in German: garden of children). You can try it online[17] first but be warned, you might end up staying up all night seeking that perfect combination.

Note: Every product has been personally tested by Toys Are Tools’ kid testers. Products were submitted to facilitate a review. Reviews are never promised.

More best toy tips from Jenn at Toys Are Tools[18].

References

  1. ^ Roominate Deluxe (poof-slinky.com)
  2. ^ Vanilla Ice (www.diynetwork.com)
  3. ^ Young Architect (poof-slinky.com)
  4. ^ The Play Kitchen (theplaykitchen.strikingly.com)
  5. ^ Zometool Creator 1 (www.zometool.com)
  6. ^ Disruptus (funnybonetoys.com)
  7. ^ MaKey MaKey (makeymakey.com)
  8. ^ paint (www.youtube.com)
  9. ^ Sphero (www.gosphero.com)
  10. ^ Richard Gottlieb (www.forbes.com)
  11. ^ education initiative: SPRK (Schools -Parents -Robots -Kids) (http)
  12. ^ Thames & Kosmos Remote Control Machines (www.thameskosmos.com)
  13. ^ The Big Creativity Can (creativitycan.com)
  14. ^ LEGO Mixels (www.lego.com)
  15. ^ Kaleidograph (kaleidographtoy.com)
  16. ^ “Gifts” of Friedrich Froebel (www.froebelgifts.com)
  17. ^ try it online (kaleidographtoy.com)
  18. ^ Toys Are Tools (www.toysaretools.com)

toys kids – Google News